Use of individual plans in NAV

To ensure comprehensive and coordinated service delivery, end-users who require long-term and comprehensive health and social assistance are entitled to have an individual plan (IP) drawn up for them to suit their specific needs. An IP is a tool used to coordinate services received by end-users from health and other public services. IP is also used to maintain a cooperation between end-users and the institutions that provide support to them. Numbers from Statistics Norway show that only few people who are entitled to an IP have one (Statistisk Sentralbyrå, 2020. See: https://www.ssb.no/statbank/table/13006).

Objectives and research questions

This project has two main objectives. The first objective is to assess why most end-users of NAV who are entitled to an IP do not have one, although case managers in NAV have an obligation to inform them about their right to have an IP worked out if they want to. The second objective of the project is to investigate which other suitable means of providing comprehensive and coordinated services across the different welfare institutions are used other than using the IP.

The research questions are as follows:

  1. What are the challenges that case managers in NAV face while working with clients who require or have IPs?
  2. What are the experiences of end-users who have an IP, regarding its implementation and it’s use for coordination of services?
  3. What are the experiences of end-users who do not have an IP, concerning comprehensive and coordinated service provisions?
  4. What other service options are available for end-users where an IP is not utilized?

Methods

To answer the research questions, I will conduct semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions with case managers in NAV and with end-users.

Significance of this project:

The project will highlight the characteristics of the work of case managers in certain NAV offices which inhibit the use of IPs. Furthermore, the project will shed more light on existing ways of providing coordinated and comprehensive service provisions which so far have not been given much attention.

The project is owned by UiT The Arctic University of Norway. The project activities are part of the research group Profesjoner og velferdssamfunn (ProVel) | UiT. Primary investigator in the project is research fellow, Sonia Delali Acheampong. The project is supervised by Professor Walter Schönfelder and Associate Professor Elin Anita Nilsen.

 

Project results will be published on this site as the project proceeds.